chukar



The chukar, an import from India, Asia and Africa, and the Hungarian partridge from Europe can be grouped together for this study.

Their markings and habits are somewhat similar and they are found generally in the northern prairie states and into Canada, having gained a foothold there after repeated failures in other parts of the Northern Hemisphere. They are also found as artificial plantings on the many commercial shooting preserves particularly in the East and in California.

The chukar is a fast flying bird that quickly understands what the hunter is up to when shot over to any degree and so offers exciting work with gun and dog.

It is a short-tailed partridge of soft grey coloration marked with greyish-brown bars on the flanks. The feet and the bill are coral-red. It weighs a little more than the "Hun," from one to one and one-half pounds, while the "Hun" rarely weighs over a pound.

chukar It is a short-tailed partridge of soft grey coloration marked with greyish-brown bars on the flanks. The feet and the bill are coral-red. It weighs a little more than the "Hun," from one to one and one-half pounds, while the "Hun" rarely weighs over a pound.

The "Hun" is more plump in shape, greyish over-all but with defined chestnut-colored bar markings on the flanks. Both are seed and grain eaters and seem to survive well on farms of the Middle West and lately in the more southern states.

Sportsmen looked to these imports to bolster the failing crop of quail, and pheasant in certain areas. They have not been disappointed in the sporting qualities of the species, but have had a hard time in establishing them so that they will breed in the wild where they are most needed.

Chukars and "Huns" are a covey-type bird and in habits not unlike the native quail. They hold well to a good dog and when they take wing their flight is speedy and direct, similar to our bob white.

While both species are strong birds, they have yet to reach the status of the pheasant even in their most established range. It is hoped, however, that through the years, the future generation of these birds will build up to the rigors of life in America and that both will become well established "natives."

They are a good bird as a table delicacy, and also make good decorations for the den as mounted specimens, being a trifle more colorful than the American quail.

Their breeding and nesting times are similar to all quail and their habit of gregariousness makes them a good bird to hunt as they will generally rise in groups rather than in singles or pairs.

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